the „perb“ seems to be SELinux „missing context“.

hostnamectrl; # tested on
CentOS Linux 7 (Core)
Kernel: Linux 3.10.0-1062.12.1.el7.x86_64
# with latest updates as available in 2020-02

As told above, try first:

setenforce 0; # temporarily disable SELinux, can files know be seen?

if the files appear, then it’s a SELinux missing context. Enable SELinux again, then add context to folder:

setenforce 1; # enable SELinux again
# add missing context
chcon -Rt samba_share_t /srv/samba/share

creditz: https://serverfault.com/questions/625693/samba-server-on-centos-sees-shared-directories-but-no-files-visible

What is SELinux context?

SELinux is the „mysterious beast“ build by the NSA and lives inside almost EVERY Linux.

This sounds like a bad thing – but it is said to be done with „good intentions“ making the Linux system more secure, while at the same time being 100% Open Source (GitHub Repo https://github.com/SELinuxProject/selinux)  (no Trojans included… they come preinstalled with windows (CORTANA STOP LISTENING ON US!) and in cisco switch and routers)

Also IN CONTRAST TO CORTANA: If one does not trust it – one can shut it down.

based on RedHat: Processes and files are labeled with an SELinux context that contains additional information, such as:

  • SELinux user
  • SELinux role
  • SELinux type

and, optionally:

  • SELinux level

when running SELinux, all of this information is used to make access control decisions.

In Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SELinux provides a combination of:

and optionally:

as any good password policy every administrator should have:

  • level1 (everyone may know)
  • level2 (only inner circle may know (staff))

and

  • level3 (only admin may know)

security services work in a similar fashion:

Manpages:

chcon.man.txt

How do security service clearances levels work?

By example: the US gov

„…can be issued by many US gov agencies, including the

DoD issues more than 80% of all clearances.

There are three levels of DoD security clearances:[1]

  1. TOP SECRET (level3)
    • Will be applied to information in which the unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security.
  2. SECRET (level2)
    • Will be applied to information in which the unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause serious damage to the national security.
  3. CONFIDENTIAL (level1)
    • Will be applied to information in which the unauthorized disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause damage to the national security.

Additionally, the United States Department of Energy issues two levels of security clearances“

src: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._security_clearance_terms

… then comes WikiLeaks and declares everything public domain.

Of course they don’t like it.

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